Risk Assessment

By The Media Training Hub Team Posted at 24/04/2020 Travel

Risk Assessment

 

Any filming assignment comes with its own unique set of risks and the risk of injury varies from minimal to severe depending on where the team is filming. For example, a studio pack shot presents minimal risk whereas filming in an active war zone would be extremely hazardous. 

 

A risk assessment is a procedure for identifying possible risks in the workplace and how to make sure the team is kept safe when at work. It’s a legal requirement in the UK and should not be seen as an unnecessary bureaucratic exercise that creates huge amounts of paperwork but rather as a very useful safety document which can be referred to on a daily basis during team briefings. It’s also important to understand that if an injury occurs as a result of the PRA recommendations not being followed, then any resulting insurance claim can be invalid and criminal negligence proceedings may follow. 

 

A risk assessment comes in the form of a ‘risk matrix’ which works through all the possible risks that may be encountered for a particular assignment. Each risk is rated from ‘low’ to ‘high’ and then describes what procedure is in place to mitigate or eliminate the risk. Once prepared the PRA is distributed to the production office, the client & the crew on location.

 

Because risks have been identified in advance, the location team know what to expect and will take active precautions to avoid the risks which generally makes for a safe, enjoyable and uninterrupted shoot. If, in the unfortunate event of an incident occurring, then the team have a clear planned procedure to follow which will mitigate the impact of the incident.

 

Risk example: Snake bite

 

The location team are filming in a rain forest where venomous snakes are present.

The PRA is carried by each team member and will note the following:

 

  • Team will where boots or snake gaiters as advised
  • Local advisor or guide will identify the likelihood of snakes in a particular habitat
  • Local advisor will check the immediate area for snakes before filming starts
  • Crew advised not to move into unchecked areas
  • If bitten, team will attempt to identify the snake by photograph or description
  • Team first aider will immobilize the casualty and administer appropriate first aid
  • PRA notes the nearest hospital or centre with antivenom available
  • Call the hospital. Contact names & numbers are on the PRA
  • Follow pre planned evacuation procedure

 

Risk example: Filming in an industrial setting

 

Filming a production process, machinery or on a factory floor. The PRA will note the following:

 

  • All crew will go through induction training as required by the company’s health & safety rules
  • All crew will wear necessary PPE as advised
  • Crew will be accompanied by a qualified staff member
  • Crew will be made aware of any hazards and hazardous materials
  • Crew will be made aware of evacuation procedures

 

Risk example: Long haul flight

 

Long haul flights can be demanding and tiring and often the time from check in to arrival at your final destination can be between 14 and 36 hours. The PRA will note risks associated with long haul flying:

 

  • Manual handling of equipment.
  • Team should avoid excessive alcoholic drinks on the flight
  • Team should take occasional stretches and walk around the cabin where possible
  • Members of the team should not drive a vehicle immediately after a long haul flight
  • Allow for time zone change & acclimatization
  • Where possible, a rest or light duties day should follow a long haul flight

Risk Assessment template

Download Production Risk Assessment template


 

PRODUCTION RISK ASSESSMENT 

PRODUCTION: 

PRODUCTION COMPANY:  

PRODUCTION OFFICE:

STUDIO DATES: 

LOCATION FILMING DATES:

LOCATION ADDRESS:

 

 

 

Producer/Director:                    Office Tel:                        Mobile:   

            

HAZARD CHECKLIST

 

 

  COP

Tick

 

 

COP

Tick

1

Access/egress blocked/ restricted/ firelanes

 

 

25

Night operations (filming) / overnight strikes

 

 

2

Alcohol / food/drinks / hospitality / security

 

 

26

Noise / high sound levels

 

 

3

Animals/insects: wild, performing etc.

 

 

27 

Practical flame /fires / flambeaux

 

 

4

Any special prop, tool etc., under the direct control of Artistes, front of Camera etc.

 

 

28

Radiation - sources / equipment etc.

 

 

5

Audience safety / seating / Crowds / Public

 

 

29

Filming away from studios / set /2nd unit etc.

 

 

6

Compressed gas / cryogenics / low temperature (also refer number38-dry ice)

 

 

30

Scaffolds / rostra / decking / platforms /

practical staircase / walkways on set

 

 

7

Confined space / tanks / caves / tunnels on or under set / staging.

 

 

31

Scenery/flats over 12 ft x 10 ft. / Non-standard shape and \ or centre of gravity. (‘fly’or floor)

 

 

8

Derelict buildings / dangerous structures /

isolation of services / waste control

 

 

32

Scenic/set materials - not fire retardant /

toxicity tested

 

 

9

Diving operations

 

 

33

Scenery manual handling difficulties

 

 

10

Explosives / pyrotechnics / fireworks

 

 

34

Scenic materials: e.g. glass/polystyrene

 

 

11

Fatigue / long hours / physical exertion / adrenaline  flow / stress / early start/strike

 

 

35

Smoking on set / studio (special permission required from the Production Manager 

 

 

12

Fire Prevention / Evacuation Procedures

 

 

36

Special ‘flying’ / technical rigs

 

 

13

First Aid / Medical Requirements

 

 

37

Special needs / children / elderly / disabled

 

 

14

Flammable materials, e.g. painting / spraying required

 

 

38

Special visual effectsrain / snow / fire / physical / smoke / steam / dry ice / heat:

 

 

15

Flying / aircraft / balloons / parachutes

 

 

39

Scenery / props storage on premises/ location

 

 

16

Freelance crews / scenic ops. / Contractors

 

 

40

Stunts/ dangerous activities / hazardous props

 

 

17

Hazardous substances:- chemicals /  dust (sand) / fumes / poisons / asbestos / battery acid etc. / waste disposal

 

 

41

Technical facilities (visual); e.g. handhelds /  DVC / camera cables / camera movement / special cable runs / scanners / PSC / OB’s etc

 

 

18

Heat / sun / cold / extreme climate changes

 

 

42

Vehicles / motorcycles / speed

 

 

19

Heavy loads on studio floor \ location

 

 

43

Water / proximity to water / tanks / aqua park

 

 

20

L.P.G. / bottled gases / welding equipment

 

 

44

Weapons / knives / firearms

 

 

21

Lasers / other bright lights / strobes

 

 

45

Work at height: zip-up/ladders/ talascope etc.

 

 

22

Lifting equipment, e.g. forklift / cranes.

 

 

46

Working on grid  / ‘truss’ etc.

 

 

23

Lighting equipment (grid) / practicals (set)

 

 

47

Working / storage under seating

 

 

24

Live electrical equipment / tools / practicals

 

 

48

Others e.g. games / scams / VT \ DVC inserts 

 

 

  •        Identify which hazards are involved in the Production and tick the appropriate box above.

·           State overleaf whether risks associated with each identified hazard are either high, medium or low. 

                                              (refer to RISK MATRIX - RAMATRIX.DOC for guidance)

·           Specify control measures initiated in reducing risks to an acceptable level, state the resulting risk factor.

·           Inform those persons exposed to any risk of the control measures to be adopted.

·           Monitor to ensure controls are in place and working effectively.

·           Keep all Risk Assessment documentation for a minimum of three years.

  •         The form must be signed by the originator and finally the Producer.                   

Send copies to:-

 

Distribution:- 

The Production Manager will send a copy of this risk assessment to the following staff:- 

 

 

Distribution -     Location:

 

 




 
 

Description of shoot/production: 

 

 

 

 

State whether persons ‘at risk’ are: Staff(S), Freelance(F), Contractor(C) ,Performer/Presenter(P), Public/Audience(U):

Hazard Number

+

Persons

Exposed

MAIN RISKS IDENTIFIED  

(Describe risks and state if considered to be high (H), medium (M) or  low (L) before any controls are introduced.

CONTROLS TO MINIMISE RISK

(Include names of experts or contractors to be used)

             Indicate the risk state after control initiatives are introduced. i.e. (H/M/L):

Ensure person(s) responsible for taking action in the control procedure are named and a

                                      copy of this assessment is given to them.

 

 

Risk: ??

 

 

 

 

Risk after controls: ??

 

 

Risk: ??

 

 

 

Risk after controls: ??

 

 

Risk: ??

 

 

 

Risk after controls: ??

 

 

Risk: ??

 

 

 

Risk after controls: ??

 

 

RISK ASSESSOR:                                                          POSITION: 

 

 

SIGNATURE:                                                                 DATE:     

 

PRODUCER:                                                                                   SIGNATURE:                                                         DATE:

            

                                                                                                 

 

MANAGING DIRECTOR:                            SIGNATURE:                                                               DATE:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional notes:     

 

 



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